The Aftermath of a Holiday

I adore my family. I look forward to big gatherings because it’s a chance to see everyone at once. We all have busy lives and don’t get to visit with each other as much as we used to, so holidays turn into more of a reunion than a regular holiday.

That was no different this year except we had some new faces. There were girlfriends of nephews, parents of my sister-in-law, and relatives of my aunt. We squeezed twenty-five people into my brother’s house and managed to sit down and eat together. That’s truly a feat that I’m not sure we’ve ever managed.

I adored Thanksgiving. I ate too much, watched too much football (although is there any such thing?), and gooed at my newest nephew too much. Yet by three o’clock, I was twitching with the need to be alone.

My family is filled with dominant personalities. I can be quiet for long periods of time and don’t have a problem being alone either. I call it “being private” other people call it “anti-social”. *snort* So being surrounded by no less than fifteen people (all blood relatives) who like to talk loudly about anything and everything and want to be the center of attention can be overwhelming sometimes. The other ten people were either married to relatives or relatives of those who married into the family.

It’s the funniest thing, something we’ve all commented on before, but we tend to marry quieter people. I guess because if we hooked up with someone as loud as we were, we’d never be able to have intelligent conversations at home. The in-laws bond together and shake their heads at the rest of us, or close their eyes and pray for patience because of something we’ve said, or they just sit back and ignore us. It’s a defence mechanism. Poor things.

Back to Thanksgiving. The minute the last car door slammed at around six that evening, I ran to my room, put on my pajamas, and huddled on the sofa trying to recover from family overload. Ah, it was blissfully quiet with my dog and cat coming out of hiding to cuddle next to me. Le sigh. Happiness in silence.

And then I remembered someone mentioned Christmas and I cringed. Do we have to do this again? So soon??

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About danicaavet

Danica Avet lives and writes in the wilds of South Louisiana. Unmarried with no children, she's the proud pet of two cats and a dog. With a BA in History, she decided there were enough fry cooks in the world and tried her hand at writing. Danica loves losing herself in the antics of her characters and blushes more often than not at the things they do. She likes to define her work as paranormal romance with a touch of Cajun spice, but most times her characters turn the notch up to "five-alarm fire"!
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9 Responses to The Aftermath of a Holiday

  1. It is rather a shame that all the big party times are clumped together.I had a wonderful Thanksgiving, but frankly, even though everyone around me is all decorated for Christmas, I am cringing at the thought.I usually decorate like mad myself, but I guess I was too stressed-out over getting ready for Thanksgiving and out-of-town guests.Do you think we could revive Washington’s Birthday and let George step aside for Jesus? I can’t imagine that he wouldn’t gladly share.I need more time this year!

    • danicaavet says:

      It seems like the beginning of the year is always slow but once we reach May, everything snowballs until you’re shooting toward the end of the year like ak torpedo. *shudder*

  2. Laurie Ryan says:

    I, too, LOVE the holiday gatherings. Then, after everyone’s gone home, my next favorite time is puttering…putting our house back in order and reflecting…quietly…on the day.

  3. I’m right there with you. My husband’s family is very loud and I try to hide in the corner with the inlaws. Of course, we don’t go over there anymore for big holidays since his parents died, so it’s a lot quieter. I’m totally not wanting to do Christmas this year. No spirit at all. None.

  4. jeff7salter says:

    “Family overload” — describes perfectly the feeling I have after more than a few hours of folks. I MUCH prefer visiting with people one-on-one … when real communication and fellowship can take place. The larger groups are — as you point out so well — competitions over who is loudest and most dominant. Might be fun for the winner of that contest, but everybody else is miserable.

  5. Micki Gibson says:

    And that is why I feel my husband is a saint. He puts up with me and my family (the loud ones). Of course in his family, he’s the quiet one of the bunch and I have to bite my tongue. A lot. But I have to say, as one of the talkative ones, we’re pretty thankful for you quiet folks because when it gets to be too much for us, it’s nice to know we can spend time with you and not have to say anything. A calm oasis in the sea of chaos.

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