Jillian’s Writing Prompt

I’m not very good at thinking of writing prompts but I’ll give it a whirl. In keeping with the fact that it’s July, I’ll make it related to this month.

Imagine you’re a young man in 1776 who has just heard about the Declaration of Independence and want to take part in throwing off the yoke of British oppression. Imagine you’re leaving tomorrow to head to Philadephia from Colonial Williamsburg. What would you say to your mother? Your father? Your sweetheart? And what would you pack to take with you on your journey? How would you get there?

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The author of these blog posts is a lawyer by day and fiction writer by night.
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22 Responses to Jillian’s Writing Prompt

  1. Lavada Dee says:

    I’d say you do a great job of writing prompts. You would be fun to brainstorm plot idea’s with.

  2. tonettejoyce says:

    Is this a writing prompt or an essay question fron 9th grade history class?
    LOL!
    I guess I misunderstood;I thought we had to hand in our reports, Teacher; that’s why I answered Micki’s in full yesterday.

  3. tonettejoyce says:

    Listen, Sister!(as opposed to “Buster!); I only got one F in my whole life and that was on a 5th grade test with ther rest of the class,(one person got a D-).The teacher apologized as she thought that she must have done something wrong,(yeah).She went over the material and we retook the test.

  4. Micki Gibson says:

    Hmmm, if I ever decide to take on the challenge of writing historical fiction YA, I think this would be a good start. I’m guessing this young man (and who’s to say how young he’d be back in that age) might not be going, “Hey Mom! Have you seen my iPhone?” (This is what happens when I get into my delirious I-should-be-packing-for-tomorrow’s-trip mode.)

  5. Laurie Ryan says:

    I don’t want an F. He’d say This is our future. I have to go.” And he’d pack clothes, food, and one momento. Then, shortly after he left, his kickass sweetheart would put her guy pants on, pack her gun and follow to keep him safe.

  6. tonettejoyce says:

    As his father relates the news that he just brought from the town square, news they all hoped for, he stood up straight. His mother wanted freedom from England, but she turned her back to him, knowing that that those words would also bring news that she dreaded.He walked over to her and held her by her shoulders which shook with silent sobs and told her that he had to go, for his conscience and for all of their family; he wanted his own children and his younger brothers and sisters to live without oppression. He told his father that he already had his bag packed in anticipation and with or without his blessing, he would go.His father not only gave the young man his blessing, he gave him his own horse to take him north. His mother made sure that he had clean clothing, a sturdy blanket , food and the musket that her own father had given her to protect their home. He meant to leave by the morning light,but this evening, he would try to make Agatha understand why he had to go, and get her promise to wait for him.

  7. Jeff Salter says:

    Okay, if this was me, in 1776 —
    I’d try to finagle a horse to ride on,
    I’d take dry powder, lead for bullets, and the best musket in the house … plus a Bowie knife (even though the Bowie had not yet been invented). And some beef jerky.
    I’d tell my parents to get ready to pack up the household in case the Brits got by us.
    I’d tell the girlfriend that it was gonna be really dangerous … and I’d hate to die a virgin.

  8. Pingback: Writing Prompt: Effective Openings

  9. Pingback: Writing Prompt: Effective Openings

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