“Ekam Eveileb”

“Children are the ones that know exactly what’s going on in the world, you know. They ‘see’ more than adults, ‘believe’ in more, are honest, and will always, ‘always’ let you know where you stand.”
― Cecelia Ahern, If You Could See Me Now

Before I go into details about this week’s theme “In which famous novel would you want to be (temporarily) a character?”, I would like to add a sentence or two about an exhibition I went to see on Saturday – the traveling Anne Frank exhibition. Personally, I expected more from the exhibition, but it was, nonetheless, very interesting and in a way, very important for my daughter to learn about that part of her German background.

Two things I learned that I hadn’t known. First, that Anne’s father had actually survived and only died in 1980. Then this one:
Frank aspired to become a journalist, writing in her diary on Wednesday, 5 April 1944:
I finally realized that I must do my schoolwork to keep from being ignorant, to get on in life, to become a journalist, because that’s what I want! I know I can write …, but it remains to be seen whether I really have talent …
I want to be useful or bring enjoyment to all people, even those I’ve never met. I want to go on living even after my death! And that’s why I’m so grateful to God for having given me this gift, which I can use to develop myself and to express all that’s inside me!
When I write I can shake off all my cares. My sorrow disappears, my spirits are revived! But, and that’s a big question, will I ever be able to write something great, will I ever become a journalist or a writer?
— Anne Frank

It seems inappropriate to follow the above with a casual blog post, so I hope you forgive me the sudden “change of pace”. I will keep it short, indeed.

When I saw the theme of this week I had no hesitation – the character would I like to be is Ivan from the novel “If you could see me now”.

At the age of six, Luke claims to have a friend named Ivan whom Elizabeth cannot see. Though at first she is exasperated with this imaginary friend, she starts playing along with Luke when she learns that imaginary friends will only last about 3 months.
Though invisible to most, Ivan is real. Only Luke and Saoirse can see him, though he comes to realise that Elizabeth can feel his presence. Knowing that only people who are in real need of a friend are able to see him, he follows Elizabeth around. When, suddenly, she is able to see him, Ivan is delighted, but disappointed just as quickly when she thinks him to be the father of one of Luke’s friends. A friendship which soon turns into romance blossoms between the two.

Ivan comes from a place called “Ekam Eveileb” – a place I’d love to go and visit one day. “Make Believe”. It’s a story about love, dreams, hopes and invisible friends. Ivan teaches Elizabeth to live, love AND believe. She learns that the impossible can be possible as long as you believe.

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About Iris B

Iris Blobel was born and raised in Germany and only immigrated to Australia in the late 1990s. Having had the travel bug most of her life, Iris spent quite some time living in Scotland, London as well as Canada where she actually had met her future husband. Her love for putting her stories onto paper has only recently emerged, but now her laptop is a constant companion. Iris resides west of Melbourne with her husband and her beautiful two daughters as well as her dog. Next to her job at a private school she also presents a German Program at the local Community Radio
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14 Responses to “Ekam Eveileb”

  1. This sounds like a fascinating story! I can understand why you would want to be Ivan, since he’s the one who helps others find happiness. I remember studying The Diary of Anne Frank – and I remember the last scene when the father returns to the apartment, all alone. How sad.

    I’d have a hard time picking a book I’d like to appear in. I’d want to be a strong person, someone who deals with difficult times in her own way and usually triumphs. Scarlett O’Hara comes to mind. Or maybe Bridget Jones.

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    • Iris B says:

      Thanks Patty. Yes, “If you could see me now” is, without a doubt, one of my favourite books.
      Anne Frank’s book wasn’t on our curriculum at school, and it wasn’t a book I was interested in reading to be honest. The exhibition was an eyeopener (although I’d known a few things already obviously from my mum)
      Never read “Gone with the wind” or “Bridget Jones”, but I’m surprised by the opposite of characters? Or is that my lack of knowledge?

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  2. jeff7salter says:

    Interesting choice of book & character, Iris.
    I don’t have a clue what I’ll arrive at for this week’s Thursday blog. It might end up being Popeye the Sailor Man. Ha.
    One note on the Anne Frank diary — several years ago I read that modern scholars had analyzed the earliest manuscripts and now believe that Anne’s father took the surviving diary of his daughter and basically re-wrote it. The original interpretation was that the father had only revised the diary, correcting spelling and dates, etc. But this newest interpretation is that he used the diary entries as a starting point and basically fleshed out [ ? rewrote ? ] what was there. In many ways it makes no difference, since the events portrayed are historical facts. However, for anyone analyzing the writing itself, they would need to know that Anne’s work may have been quite heavily edited.

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    • Iris B says:

      I can see you as Popeye the Sailor eating spinach and madly in love with Denise 😉 I look forward to reading you post!
      I had a quick read through Wikipedia (although my youngest daughter (9!) keeps telling me not to trust that site) for a bit of background so I’m not telling completely incorrect. It says on this site “Otto Frank used her original diary, known as “version A”, and her edited version, known as “version B”, to produce the first version for publication. He removed certain passages, most notably those in which Frank is critical of her parents (especially her mother), and sections that discussed Frank’s growing sexuality. Although he restored the true identities of his own family, he retained all of the other pseudonyms”
      And I agree with you, it’s the contents that’s important and the message is spreading around the world.

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  3. pjharjo says:

    I am very interested and intrigued by your choice of novel and character, Iris! It would be so exciting to have such a friend as Ivan. and thrilling to be the one he helped to love! And thanks to Jeff on his alert on the editing done on Anne’s diary. Like Jeff, I have absolutely no idea what I am going to post…tomorrow! but I’m working on it, and you might have given me an idea, Iris. 🙂

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    • Iris B says:

      Glad to have given you an idea, Janette.
      I love Cecelia Ahern. It’s a bit hit and miss with the books, but out of my favourite books, there are many written by her!
      Can’t wait to read your post today (our time 🙂 )

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  4. What a great choice, Iris! Oh, I do love so many of Cecelia Ahern’s novels.”If You Could See Me Now” is my niece’s absolute favorite and certainly one of mine. I may do an Ahearn book myself for Friday…we’ll see…so many books to chose from!
    btw, I also heard that Anne Frank’s diary was a true adolescent’s girl’s diary and the father edited out her thoughts and questions about sexuality.

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    • Iris B says:

      Tonette, I was waiting for you to comment, because I knew you like Cecelia’s stories as well. I’ve got another one creeping closer and closer to the top of my TBR list and I can’t wait. I loved the last one I read. I can’t wait for your post on Friday.

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      • I have been very tied-up ,Iris…getting ready for school to start for the grandkids on Thursday.(Open House/Meet the Teachers night was tonight for the bigger ones!)
        I will have to think hard to narrow this down.I don’t usually put myself into stories.
        As for Cecelia Ahern, she has been so young to have had such insight …My heart breaks for Rosie Dunne! I love Thanks For the Memories…you get the idea!

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      • Iris B says:

        That time already again that the kids have to go back to school? I understand, it’s a VERY busy time 🙂
        Not sure, I know I’ve read Rosie Dunne, but it’s not locked in my memory, so I have a feeling that was one of the books I’d consider a CA “miss”.

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  5. Really??? You might know it as “Where the Rainbow Ends”. Personally,I think “The Book of Tomorrow” was her biggest ‘miss’.

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    • Iris B says:

      That title rings a bell, but from memory, it wasn’t one I liked otherwise it would’ve clicked with me straight away. The biggest “miss” IMHO was “Thanks for the memories”. I think I donated the book to the library I was so disappointed.

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