From the life of a teenager …

Well, hello everyone … nice to have you visiting again!

Today, the 14th July, is the 195th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 170 days remaining until the end of the year.

It’s also Bastille Day, or French National Day – La FΓͺte Nationale!

Our topic this week: Figures of Speech. Again, I was about to check with my good buddy Wikipedia for some help, when daughter #1 offered (possibly more out of boredom than anything else) to help … How can I refuse πŸ™‚

Here’s what she came up with.

Every kid dreams of being a teenager, but words can be deceiving as being a teenager can be a lot different than words can explain. Everyone wants to be 13, have Facebook and be called a teenager. You don’t know what it actually means to be a teenager. You would think being a teenager gives you extra privileges, which it does, but it also comes with extra responsibility. People now look at you differently and at a higher rank. Even now, a month after my 13th birthday it is just sinking in that I am a teenager, that I am 13.Carleigh

Becoming a teenager is also starting a new chapter in your life. Through these years you’re going to experience some of the best moments that you ever will, but with that also comes a few moments thrown in there. You might have your first relationship, first kiss and first heartbreak. You will be doubted, praised and even be put down. But you have to go through these moments with positivity and courage because if you let the bad comments get to you, you’ll never get anywhere. When you get past these moments and start to smile and laugh you will be the best person you can possibly be.

One thing that teenagers do a lot is that they hide their real, true self. They want to be in the ‘cool club’ so they do things that their normal self would never do. They think that their friends are the people around them when they do this, but their friends are actually the people in the background that don’t need attention, but they act themselves around one another. All they have to do is say ‘no’ and walk away to make real friends that will stick beside you beside you throughout all your problems. You don’t need to have the latest clothes, the most make-up on your face or the best body to be friends with them because if they are your real friends than they won’t judge you.

So becoming a teenager is a great thing that happens in your life and brings lots of positive moments in your life, but there will always be the negative moments that will affect you, but you have to live through these times. Living through these times will only make you a better person.

By Carleigh Blobel.

Thank you all for stopping by – please support my “little” girl by leaving a comment.

Being a mother is not about what you gave up to have a child, but what you’ve gained from having one.

 

Empire State Bldg in German Colours

Empire State Bldg in German Colours to celebrate Germany’s World Cup Win 2014

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About Iris B

Iris Blobel was born and raised in Germany and only immigrated to Australia in the late 1990s. Having had the travel bug most of her life, Iris spent quite some time living in Scotland, London as well as Canada where she actually had met her future husband. Her love for putting her stories onto paper has only recently emerged, but now her laptop is a constant companion. Iris resides west of Melbourne with her husband and her beautiful two daughters as well as her dog. Next to her job at a private school she also presents a German Program at the local Community Radio
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37 Responses to From the life of a teenager …

  1. Lovely post, Iris. You obviously have a very grounded, thoughtful daughter.

    Like

    • Iris B says:

      Thank you so much Heather. Yes, somewhere along the way we must’ve done something right. Let’s hope we can guide her through teenage years just as smoothly.

      Like

  2. Jenny says:

    Hi Carleigh,
    You don’t know how refreshing it is to hear a young girl talk as you have.
    My teenage years are far in the past, but you bring back memories of what happened in the school grounds as if it were yesterday.
    I was the girl who never really fitted in, who always had her head stuck in a text book studying madly for an upcoming test.
    I thing growing up these days is so much harder for the younger lot following, as you yourself know.
    You are so right, be who you are, not how other want you to be.
    Don’t betray yourself by making you someone else.
    I wish more teenagers would have their head on as straight as you seem to. There would be a lot less depression amongst our youngsters.
    Keep doing what you are doing, maybe even start a blog of your own that other teenagers can read.
    Well done.

    Like

    • Iris B says:

      First, thank you so much for stopping by Jenny. It means a lot to me, and a lot to Carleigh (who’s hopefully showing up as well to thank everyone), but also for your kind words. It one thing to feel proud when reading her post, but I’m even prouder reading how much she’s touched other people with her words.
      I’m very blessed!

      Like

    • Carleigh says:

      Thankyou very much Jenny. It means a lot to me for you to say those kind me. I hope I brought good memories back from your schooling years.

      Like

  3. Louise Guy says:

    Hi Iris, what a fantastic blog entry and eloquent writer. I agree with the post above that suggests your daughter have her own blog. Teenagers would, I think, really identify with Carleigh and perhaps give them an outlet to discuss some topics in a sensible forum with a wise teenager, as the post above suggests Carleigh is, at the helm. I only hope when my boys are Carleigh’s age that they are either as in touch with their emotions as she is or have someone like her to guide them.

    Like

    • Iris B says:

      Thank you so much, Louise, for stopping by! I believe she’s thinking of her own blog. It would be a great opportunity to “voice” her thoughts w/out hijacking mum’s blog πŸ˜‰

      Like

    • Carleigh says:

      Thankyou very much for saying those kind words to me Louise. I appreciate the time you spent reading my post and I hope you remember your schooling years and all the good and bad times in them

      Like

  4. Felicity says:

    Hi Carleigh (and Iris!) Loved your point of view! Very nicely put and you are wise beyond your years! You have so much to teach other teens! πŸ™‚ Well done to you; I’m sure your maturity will help you greatly with the ups and downs of the teenage years! You write so well – just like your Mum! <– who is so proud of you – and rightly so! πŸ™‚

    Like

    • Iris B says:

      Thank you Fliss for stopping by. πŸ™‚ It means a LOT to me … Yes, I am very very proud of her!
      Hope you’re keeping warm!

      Like

    • Carleigh says:

      Thankyou very much for your words Felicity. I am very proud that I can be related to my mum because in my eyes she is a great inspiration to me and she is a very talented writer. So for someone to write that I write as well as my mum is a massive compliment.

      Like

  5. Love that she wanted to participate! And what a great post – and I’d like to say that as soon as you exit the teenage years it all magically changes – but alas!

    Like

  6. Lovely, thought provoking post! She sounds like a wonderful teen on the right path to being an adult. You done good, mom!

    Like

    • Iris Blobel says:

      Thank you so much for stopping by Christina and thanks for your kind words. Yes, moments like when she comes up with little treasures like these make me very proud πŸ™‚

      Like

  7. You always have so much to say, Carleigh! I am not sure where this fits in with our topic this week, but ,I have said it before and I will say it again…you should really do your own blog. I think with your talent and good mind, you would do well…and get so much practice.Besides, you could also have readers of all ages,your age and slightly older…we don’t get a lot of really young traffic here.
    Think about it, truly!

    Like

  8. Helen Bath says:

    Thanks for the link so that I could check out Carleigh’s contribution. Yes you are and you should be proud of your amazing daughters. Carleigh’s enthusiasm to tackle life shines through yet again. Such an old soul! Can’t wait to see what Tara’s contribution will be when she turns 13.

    Like

  9. jeff7salter says:

    well done, Carleigh. Having, at your young age, such ability to express yourself in writing, you will surely be involved with writing and publishing for the rest of your life.
    I have a vague memory of turning 13. I also recall the dramatic “promotion” into the ranks of a teenager — FINALLY. Not much actually changed, of course. I did start working part time, but I couldn’t drive!
    One thing I often remind youngsters these days — don’t be in too much of a hurry to grow up. Act maturely and responsibly, of course, but don’t rush all the rest.

    Like

  10. pjharjo says:

    Very mature article, Carleigh. I don’t foresee you experiencing many, if any, difficulties in life even beyond your teenage years bc of your attitude. πŸ™‚ thanks for stopping by with your pov!

    Like

  11. Lisa Orchard says:

    Carleigh, You’ve hit the nail on the head! It’s so awesome to see a young teen with so much insight and wisdom. I predict big things for you, my girl! Keep on Writing! πŸ™‚

    Like

  12. Jeanne Theunissen says:

    What a great post, Carleigh! You have the makings of being a great writer, like your mum. I’m so proud to know both of you, (and Tara, too). I hope Phoebe and I can come visit again sometime soon. You’re exactly the kind of friend we want Phoebe to have!

    Like

    • Iris Blobel says:

      Thank you Jeanne. I’m really proud of her, she’s so grounded at her young age and such a wonderful “teenager”. I feel blessed having her.

      Like

      • Jeanne Theunissen says:

        You ARE blessed! You have a wonderful family, and I’m so glad to have met and become friends with you. Phoebe often asks when we can go to Ballarat again. She really enjoys your girls.

        Like

  13. Krysten H says:

    This is a great post! I suspect there’s a second writer in the family πŸ™‚

    Like

    • Iris B says:

      Thank you Krysten for commenting. When I read the blurb to your book True Colors, I thought I have to ask her to read it! it sounds like something she’d really enjoy.

      Like

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