Thanks, but No Thanks

Reading

This week’s question: What about a theme would NOT entice you to buy?

After thinking about this, I realized the key word here is BUY. I get a lot of books free – my iPad is full of books I paid little for, if anything. And before the days of ebooks I visited my library often. My local library has sales three times a year during which I can get bags full of books for a very small investment. And there are book swaps at work, at the doctor’s office, and my writers group meetings. It’s a rare occasion when I need to pay regular price for something to read. Usually, if I don’t enjoy a book, I simply close it and donate it to the next library sale.

When I DO buy a book, it’s usually because I’ve read the first in a series and want to read the rest, or because I personally know the author. But even then, there are a few things that will make me put the book back on the shelf or, if I’m buying online, will make me not click BUY.

  • Horror stories. Enough horrible things happen in everyday life, and the news does a more than adequate job of bringing these to my attention. I don’t need to read about them in my spare time. Besides, I do most of my pleasure reading before I go to bed, and I don’t need any more reasons to NOT sleep.
  • Totally unbelievable premises. I once came home with a bag full of paperbacks from the library sale. Since I got the whole bag for a dollar, I didn’t read the blurbs very carefully – I generally donate them back to the library after I read them. Anyway, I started reading one before I realized that the heroine, knowing she’d been born in Texas, believed she had what it took to work as a ranch hand – without ever having set foot on a ranch! What idiot would actually believe that? And if such a woman exists, how on earth can she be a heroine I can care about? I couldn’t finish the book. If the book had been on a shelf in the store I would have read the blurb and put it back. As it was, I was glad I hadn’t paid more than a few pennies for it.
  • Certain authors have dropped from my must read list to my do not read when I realized that they both had a tendency to create heroes who abused their heroines. Usually it was emotional abuse, but occasionally there would be physical abuse. And I see absolutely no way this can be justified. A man who abuses a woman and claims he acted out of love does not qualify as a hero in my book.

I’m sure there are other things I don’t want to read, but these are what come to mind for me. What about you?

About Patricia Kiyono

During her first career, Patricia Kiyono taught elementary music, computer classes, elementary classrooms, and junior high social studies. She now teaches music education at the university level. She lives in southwest Michigan with her husband, not far from her five children, nine grandchildren (so far), and great-granddaughters. Current interests, aside from writing, include sewing, crocheting, scrapbooking, and music. A love of travel and an interest in faraway people inspires her to create stories about different cultures. Check out her sweet historical contemporary romances at her Amazon author page: http://www.amazon.com/Patricia-Kiyono/e/B0067PSM5C/
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15 Responses to Thanks, but No Thanks

  1. jeff7salter says:

    I love book sales where you can acquire several titles — maybe even bags full — for a few dollars. Shortly before I retired, my former library began having sales, handled by the Friends of the Library. I didn’t usually make the sale itself but after it was over, I could browse the shelves during my lunch period and pick up paperbacks for 10 cents a piece.
    Presently, there’s a bookstore which has a bargain table with paperbacks for 50 cents.
    As for your “do NOT read” picks: I also don’t care for horror, or stories in which partners (of whichever gender) abuse each other. As for the unbelievable premises: if it’s done with intentional humor (& done well), I can sometimes tolerate it. But if it’s just naivete by the writer, then I won’t read it.

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    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      Library sales are wonderful! I’ve found some gems there. After the big sales, the leftovers are put on a couple of tables in the corner for a quarter each. And I agree, if the unbelievable premise is told tongue in cheek, it can be entertaining.

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  2. I agree with you completely on the no horror, there is way too much of that on the news and even when I avoid the news it ends up on my Facebook newsfeed from friends sharing it.
    We don’t have sales that large here. A once a year friends of the library sale. We’ve found some books that go for $30 (collectors, leather bound editions) for $5 there.

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    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      Yes, there’s a lot of unsavory news on social media sites, Angela. Sometimes I have to scroll down a long time to avoid it.

      Like

  3. I am a major buyer of used and cast-off books…many meed new homes here. I will have to consider my choices for Friday very carefully because, frankly, I think my home contains every genre possible.(Not that , personally, I bought all of them.)

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    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      I suppose at one time I collected books of almost every genre, but since I’ve made regular donations to the library sale I’ve streamlined my collection. Now it reflects the stuff I read – except for the books my daughter have left behind. Someday I’ll have to sort those out, too!

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  4. D Mohr says:

    I agree on the horror, I surely do not need to add any more of that to my brain cells! I purchase books from authors where I have enjoyed a book by them first, then I will pay for the rest! So a free first to introduce me has really helped me find who I like.
    I avoid paperbooks that have half clothed people on them. Yuck- its like a tabloid turnoff to me.
    In the e- realm I do not buy books that the reviewers have told me the whole story. That is such a book wrecker for me. I do not want to read a blurb that has ruined the mystery of a new adventure and people I want to meet on my own. I feel like I am still wearing my homeschool mother hat and reading a book report.

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    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      Certain books covers can definitely be a turn-off, Dana! And I never thought about it, but you’re right about the book reviews. Knowing the whole story ahead of time can make me decide not to bother reading the book. Thanks for weighing in!

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  5. Ann Kilter says:

    No horror, no thrillers/mysteries (some of them try to hook you with something horrible). Fantasy has lost much of it’s enchantment for me.

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    • Ann Kilter says:

      All of these have killing in their genre.

      Like

      • Patricia Kiyono says:

        I enjoy a good mystery, but I don’t like to read all the grisly details. My mystery reading tends to lean toward the “cozy” type. I don’t read much fantasy either, although there are a few authors like S G Rogers whose works I enjoy. Thanks for visiting, Ann!

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  6. duffybrown says:

    I’m pretty much right in there with Ann Kilter. Absolutely no children/animals hurt. A book must have some humor in it for me. I have to laugh, find something fun. I read for escape so this works best for me.

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