Crowning Glory – or Not

Bad hair

This week, one of our foxes asked about haircut disasters. I’ve had them, but never thought of them as story-worthy. I guess the first time would have been in junior high and I got tired of my bangs hanging in my eyes. Dad usually cut our hair, but at that time he was busy starting up a brand-new credit union and working lots of late nights. So I found his scissors and cut. Unfortunately, I snagged some of my left eyebrow in the process. Mom made sure Dad was always available after that.

In high school, I had long, straight hair, and it fell to my waist. Then, just before I went to college, my mother decided I needed to look more adult, and her idea of an adult look was shorter, curlier hair. She made an appointment with the owner of the salon she went to each week. I watched in horror as he chopped off about a foot of hair and subjected me to a permanent. Unfortunately, he didn’t realize that Asian hair reacts to a permanent more harshly than the hair he was accustomed to working on, and my hair burned. I looked like I’d poked my finger into an electric socket. After Mom and I sobbed for two days, she called a different girl in the shop who took pity on me and cut off the burned waves and did what she could to salvage my pride. Neither of us ever returned to that place.

After that disaster, I was much more careful about who did what to my hair. I’ve never had it colored, so it’s gradually transforming from black to white. And it’s straight, but it’s thick, and from what people who cut it tell me, it’s healthy. But having two daughters, there have been a couple of mishaps – and both were due to having permanents. Their daycare provider was also a beautician, and she suggested that my older daughter could use a little curl in her hair. I warned her about the problem I’d had, and she assured me she’d take precautions to make sure that didn’t happen. Unfortunately, whatever precautions she took didn’t quite do the job – and the poor girl had frizzy hair for a little while. My younger daughter decided in her senior year that she wanted wavy hair. So she saved up her money and found a stylist who had experience working with Asian hair and paid big bucks to have her long hair permed. The woman did a nice job and my daughter had beautiful long wavy tresses for a month. And then this child of mine decided she liked the straight look better and spent another fortune to have it removed. Sigh.

What’s your hair horror story?

 

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About Patricia Kiyono

During her first career, Patricia Kiyono taught elementary music, computer classes, elementary classrooms, and junior high social studies. She now teaches music education at the university level. She lives in southwest Michigan with her husband, not far from her five children, nine grandchildren (so far), and great-granddaughters. Current interests, aside from writing, include sewing, crocheting, scrapbooking, and music. A love of travel and an interest in faraway people inspires her to create stories about different cultures. Check out her sweet historical contemporary romances at her Amazon author page: http://www.amazon.com/Patricia-Kiyono/e/B0067PSM5C/
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7 Responses to Crowning Glory – or Not

  1. jeff7salter says:

    Well, I have to save my bad hair story for Hound Day, but I do have a comment about Asian hair.
    Kinda.
    In late 2005, after Hurricane Katrina bumped a movie production from the New Orleans area, we found two Kevin Costner movies filming scenes in the Shreveport area. In one, Kevin was a Coast Guard instructor [I think it was called “The Guardian”], but in the other he was a Jekyll & Hyde dual character named Mr. Brooks (also the title). In that one, Demi Moore was the prosecutor trying to catch him. They filmed some of Demi Moore’s scenes right outside the building where I worked.
    Demi’s Stunt double — with he long straight dark hair — was an Asian lady. I thought it interesting that a woman with “Asian” hair would be the perfect match for Demi’s hair.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      I suppose that works. The camera wouldn’t be focused on the stunt double’s eyes. And the difference seems to be in the way it reacts to certain things, not necessarily the way it looks. Were you able to see any of the stars or any of the film action?

      Liked by 1 person

      • jeff7salter says:

        I saw Demi in a few scenes. I was rousted by one of the crew because I was across the street watching while they filmed some inside a little shop. Later, I was standing — with a policeman who worked in our library — just about 20 ft from Demi as they were waiting for some setup on a shot.
        My son passed Demi and Kunster (her boyfriend at the time… who was in the other movie) on a sidewalk on the campus where he went to college.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m not sure I know many people who have had successful perm stories. My sister did but it did not work out for me.
    More on my hair disasters on Wednesday.

    Like

    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      It seems to be something that either really works for someone or really doesn’t! My younger brother (whose hair is actually much thicker and straighter than mine) actually went through a stage where he got perms on a regular basis because he went for that curly mop look. I didn’t bother to tell him I thought he looked silly.

      Like

  3. I suggested this topic but wasn’t sure where I was going with it as there are several stories but yikes! I forgot about mishaps with perms!

    Like

    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      I’ve had haircuts and a “hairdo” (back in high school) that I wasn’t particularly happy with, but the perm is the only time I was upset with what someone did to my hair.

      Like

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