I Wrote That?

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This week, one of our foxes asked, “Do you read your own books? Why or why not?”

My first response is, “Sort of.” Once I’ve managed to complete, edit, and put a book on the market, I’ll skim it, but I don’t normally read it from cover to cover. The exception to this would be when receive my shipment of print books. It’s difficult to prevent myself from opening the box, tossing the packing materials aside, and forgetting about household chores while I read the story.

This summer, I moved five of my historical romances from one publisher to another. Of course, this publisher has different editing preferences, including use of commas and past perfect tense. So, all of them were re-edited. In reviewing the edits, I was obliged to read carefully from beginning to end, and to my horror I found several errors in continuity that had been missed in previous editions. One book is in its third edition (it had been with two other publishers), and I still found minor things that needed to be adjusted.

Another time I re-read my work is when I plan a sequel or related story. If there are recurring characters, I’ll re-visit them in order to get details right. It would be odd if a character suddenly had a change in eye color or height. A setting used in more than one book would need to be consistent from one book to another.

Authors are always promoting, and I’ve joined a few groups who post on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. On all of those platforms, a picture is the key to promoting. Twitter is usually associated with text, but if you include a picture IN your tweet you can fit a lot of words ON the picture! I’ve learned to create memes that include either part of a favorable review, or a quote from the book I’m featuring. So, I’ll go back to the book and choose a quote to go with a picture I have. Of course, this means I need to dive into the book and select a quote that tells readers something about the characters or the plot. I’ve been known to open up a book intending to find something specific and end up reading three or four chapters!

I suppose the true answer to this question is a qualified yes. I do re-read my books, but not actually for pleasure, like the ones I read and review. When I read them after publication, there’s usually a purpose, whether it’s checking for details in writing a new project, or finding a suitable quote for marketing.

Do you re-read things you’ve already written and published?

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About Patricia Kiyono

During her first career, Patricia Kiyono taught elementary music, computer classes, elementary classrooms, and junior high social studies. She now teaches music education at the university level. She lives in southwest Michigan with her husband, not far from her five children, nine grandchildren (so far), and great-granddaughters. Current interests, aside from writing, include sewing, crocheting, scrapbooking, and music. A love of travel and an interest in faraway people inspires her to create stories about different cultures. Check out her sweet historical contemporary romances at her Amazon author page: http://www.amazon.com/Patricia-Kiyono/e/B0067PSM5C/
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11 Responses to I Wrote That?

  1. Interesting! Congratulations on getting a new publisher, (even if it ended up being a lot of work!)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes. Before publication, my story has been read through by me several times to make sure everything is as it should be. After publication, I have to check for information that I’ve used in other stories even though I have only reused my characters in the past and do not write series. However, I’m too busy with the next write to start reading it for pleasure. Besides, I already know the ending. LOL And there are so many other books on my TBR list. When and if the time comes when I can’t write anymore (don’t see that day coming), I suppose I’ll pull out my books and read them just for the fun of it.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Jeff Salter says:

    Like you, Patricia, I have been surprised to find little continuity glitches that somehow slipped through all my drafts (usually 5 or more) and the 3-4 stages of the edit process. I find it quite irritating to be dealing with such at that late a stage of the process, but it reminds me that even as good an editor as I think I am… I am fallible.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      Yes, it’s frustrating to find mistakes even after so many pairs of eyes have read the same passages! And yes, we are definitely fallible.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. And even a good editor will admit that they are not perfect. We all miss things. We’re human. If only some readers would realize that. But it’s usually only the readers that are authors too who criticize the mistakes, ironic as that is.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Elaine Cantrell says:

    There’s nothing like getting a box of your books. I’m always in awe that I was able to write a book.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. What a great idea, to put a quote from the book on a picture! I will have to do this.
    Which 5 books are getting rereleased? I’ll have to keep an eye out for them. I do enjoy getting second, third, fourth editions of books to see how they may have changed. Plus, I like having different covers!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      My regency Christmas series is being released by Dingbat Publishing. The Partridge and the Peartree was re-released last month, and Two Tutor Doves came out a few weeks ago. Love’s Refrain (Amelia Partridge and Phillip Peartree make a return appearance in this one) will be out soon, and edits for Three French Inns should be finished soon. Four Calling Bards will be next.

      Like

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