I Like to Read My Own Work

Since we’ve been staying inside due to Covid 19 I find that I’m reading a lot more than usual. I finished my last book pretty late one evening, and I didn’t want to start something new so late. Well, I pulled out my Kindle and decided I’d look over one of my own books. I picked Blue 52, which was always one of my favorites. Well, I read until pretty late that night.  I still love Blue 52. I’d like to share a blurb and excerpt with you. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Blurb:

“First Lady Kills President Lovinggood!”

December 5, 2018

Thirty years later, Hank Lovinggood embarks on a quest to prove his mother’s innocence and punish the killers who took his family from him. Together Hank and lovely physicist Dr. Kathryn Sinclair confront an implacable, twisted, and merciless enemy who’ll do whatever it takes to hide the truth forever.

 

Excerpt: This excerpt comes from the beginning of the story after Hank decides to start a new investigation into the murders. His Aunt Joan has amazing information for him. Aunt Joan speaks first. (Hank’s Uncle Scott was in the FBI. He was killed along with his daughters Tori and Toni.)

 

“How about starting with your Uncle Scott’s private files?”

“What private files?” Hank demanded as a shaft of excitement pierced him and set his heart racing. He set his cup on the coffee table and leaned forward. “Didn’t the FBI take everything from his office after he died?”

“Mostly, yes, but there’s one or two files left. I managed to hide them before the FBI got here. They searched his home office as well as his office at work, you know.”

“Why did you hide those files?” Hank asked.

“Because I think they pertain to Richard’s death, and I had no idea who I could trust. If Scott really was onto something, those files had to remain a secret or no Lovinggood would have been safe.”

Hank’s mouth went dry. “I think you’d better explain. If you had information that would have brought the killers to justice, you should have turned it over to the police.”

Her hands fisted. “The time wasn’t right. Originally, I planned to show the files to Dad once he got over Richard’s death, but as you know he never got over it. Then I decided to wait for you to grow up and give the files to you, but you didn’t seem like a man who’d know what to do with them. Not until now, anyway. You’ve changed, Hank, and that’s why I’ve brought you here.” Excitement filled her face as her eyes bored into his.

“As you know, the case against your mother seemed airtight. No one suggested a conspiracy or any kind of cover up. It seemed so straightforward they didn’t even bother to seal the investigation records. Every i was dotted, every t was crossed. No one doubted Elizabeth had shot and killed Richard. I don’t mind telling you I bitterly hated her, but Scott didn’t seem angry at all.

“I confronted him about it maybe three months after the murder. He said he thought things were almost too neat. He said in real life investigations were usually a little messier. He said Elizabeth wasn’t a violent person; it was out of character for her to shoot someone.

“I asked him if he had any proof she hadn’t done it. He said no, but I started to watch him and soon figured out he was working on something. One night, I walked into the study while he was in the bathroom. I saw Josh Stanton’s name on an open file. He rushed back into the room and slammed it shut before I could read it.

“This went on for almost a year. I teased him and carried on until he finally admitted he thought someone had framed Elizabeth.”

A look of incredible anguish crossed Joan’s face. “Two weeks after we had that conversation, he was dead. So were the girls. I suspect Scott too was murdered. I think he found out something so big the real murderers were afraid to let him live.” She fell silent and clenched her jaw.

Hank had never imagined his Uncle Scott’s death had been anything but an accident. If someone had murdered Scott to keep him from revealing what he knew, there really was a conspiracy! “I’m so sorry,” he said. He wanted to give Joan a hug of compassion and sympathy, but the cold glitter in her eyes warned him she wouldn’t appreciate his pity.

“I’m sorry too,” she said. “Torie would be thirty-eight and Toni thirty-five.” She sighed. “It’s hard to believe so much time has gone by.”

Hank gave her a pat on the shoulder anyway. They both knew far too much about grief and loss. “So, what do you think we should do now?”

Joan grabbed his hand and squeezed so hard it was genuinely painful. “I want you to go through the files. I want you to see if you think Scott was onto something. If so, I want you to nail them. I want them punished for every holiday we spent without our loved ones. I want them to suffer for every dance recital they cheated my girls of. I want their heads for every ball game you ever played that your father didn’t see. I want the whole world to know your mother was no murderer, and my Scott was smart enough to see through their horrible schemes. Get them, Hank, and if I can help you, I will.”

“Sounds like a plan,” Hank softly replied as his eyes caught fire and his blood roared in his ears. “Get the files for me.”

 

About Elaine Cantrell

Elaine Cantrell was born and raised in South Carolina. She has a Master’s Degree in Personnel Services from Clemson University and is a member of Alpha Delta Kappa, an international honorary sorority for women educators. She is also a member of Romance Writers of America. Her first novel A New Leaf was the 2003 winner of the Timeless Love Contest and was published in 2004 by Oak Tree Press. When she isn't writing you can find Elaine playing with her dog or maybe collecting more vintage Christmas ornaments
This entry was posted in Books, Elaine Cantrell, Miscellaneous. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to I Like to Read My Own Work

  1. Patricia Kiyono says:

    This is a really moving scene, and it makes me want to read more about his quest.

    Like

  2. Jeff Salter says:

    Terrific idea for a novel plot!

    Like

  3. I love it! It never ceases to amaze me where all of the ideas, characters and dialogue comes from. You’d never suspect by looking at you that murder would be anywhere on your mind. Well, good for all of us, I say!
    I must get to that one.
    I’ve had trouble concentrating on books through all of this.

    Like

  4. trishafaye says:

    Interesting snippet! You caught my attention! Thanks for sharing it with us!

    Like

  5. Can’t wait to read the rest.

    Like

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