More Time to Write, Right?

We’ve previously discussed how summers typically affect our writing schedules or outputs, but this summer of 2020 was unique in many ways. Tell us whether these unique factors affected your writing… and whether that was to the “good” or the “bad” in terms of output.

To say that the summer of 2020 is unique is probably an understatement. I’m missing a lot of things that I always enjoy doing.

First, there’s family vacation. We always go to Garden City Beach in South Carolina, but most of the Covid 19 cases are there around the beach. Neither my son nor I wanted to take the chance of anyone getting sick. So, no vacation this year.

I’ve also had to cancel several standing weekly events that I enjoy. No more weekly dinners with my friends, no more church study group, no more Saturday nights with people we’ve gone out with for over a quarter of a century. I feel unsafe to even hop in the car and drive downtown to shop for things I really need, things like chocolate, sandals, or puppy dog treats. I’ve been good and mostly stayed home because I already have lung issues. I really don’t need Covid 19.

So, now I have more time to write, right? Well, not really. I sit down in front of my computer, and if I reach a place in the story that requires a little more concentration I’ll just quit. I tell myself that I’ll do it tomorrow after I get up when my brain is sharpest. And most of the time I do try, but somehow having a whole day in front of me with nothing to do sucks all my motivation away. I have a completed manuscript that needs a final edit before I send it in, but I can’t make myself do it. Apparently, the busier I am the easier it is for me to accomplish tasks. Before I retired I longed for more writing time, but I now plainly see that I should be careful what I wish for.

What about you? Do you do better when you’re busier?

About Elaine Cantrell

Elaine Cantrell was born and raised in South Carolina. She has a Master’s Degree in Personnel Services from Clemson University and is a member of Alpha Delta Kappa, an international honorary sorority for women educators. She is also a member of Romance Writers of America. Her first novel A New Leaf was the 2003 winner of the Timeless Love Contest and was published in 2004 by Oak Tree Press. When she isn't writing you can find Elaine playing with her dog or maybe collecting more vintage Christmas ornaments
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6 Responses to More Time to Write, Right?

  1. Jeff Salter says:

    I’ve worked on deadlines a LOT… and can’t say I ever appreciated it. To me, it adds to the stress. But I was able to handle that stress in my younger years — during several years of photo-journalism and editing with various newspapers, for example.
    Later, as co-author of 4 large writing projects, including two non-fiction books.
    Later, as presenter of seminars on library security.
    So, yes… I am able to produce under the pressure of deadlines (when I’m already “busy”)… but I don’t like it. Especially as I’ve gotten older.
    In the past two years, I had external deadlines under which to produce initial drafts of a complete novel and a half-written novel that required a major course correction. That was murder. Of course, I’m accustomed to deadlines for the multiple stages of edits that follow those initial complete drafts… but composing a first draft under deadline is definitely NOT my cup of tea.
    How did I get off on deadlines?
    Well, to me, it fits in with the notion of whether one is able to be more productive while busy.
    I guess my reply is: maybe so, but I hated the accompanying stress for those 12 or 13 months.

    Like

  2. It’s ….complicated. It really is.I have not yet pinned-down what the problem is, or are, but life hasn’t bee easy.

    Like

  3. Patricia Kiyono says:

    I’m becoming better and better at procrastinating. There’s always some little task that needs to be done right now, and even scrubbing toilets is preferable to digging into the manuscript and fixing what needs to be fixed!

    Liked by 1 person

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