Return Trip

Our Tuesday Fox asked, “Is there a place that you have traveled to when you were younger that you wish you could visit again?”

Looking at the wording of this question – specifically, the phrase “wish you could” –  I get the feeling she’s inferring that we’re supposed to name a place we’ve visited that we’re not likely to visit again for one reason or another. Right now, my health and finances are such that traveling almost anywhere is possible, although a year-long cruise around the world might be out of reach. But then, I’ve never done that before, so it doesn’t qualify. 

Until a few years ago, I traveled a lot. Since retiring from full-time teaching in 2005 I’ve been to Japan, England, France, Mexico, and Greece. When the pandemic hit, my brother and I were working on a plan to allow our mother to spend several months with her sisters: one of us would fly there with her and spend a week or two before coming home alone. Then the other one would fly out a week or two before the end of her visit and then bring her home. But of course, that trip and many other “maybe” trips were put aside. 

During my high school years, I went on two memorable trips. One was to the American Rocky Mountains with a group that created a travelogue. And then during the summer between my junior and senior years I had the honor of playing in the American Youth Symphony and toured England, Ireland, Austria, Switzerland, and Italy. 

My family didn’t travel much together, but we went on one trip to Gettysburg, Mammoth Caves, and Niagara Falls. My husband didn’t enjoy traveling, but he went with me twice: to Las Vegas for our honeymoon and with our daughters to Montreal. Without hubby, the girls and I went everywhere. Both of our daughters played in the marching band the year that they were invited to play in the Fiesta Bowl in Phoenix, so I joined a large group of parents who went along to cheer them on. When my older daughter was in college, she did a presentation at the American Psychological Association’s Convention in New Orleans and invited me to go along. I’ve got relatives on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, so my younger daughter and I went to visit, and alone I’ve gone on short trips to Texas, South Dakota, and Louisville. 

So I’ve managed to see quite a bit of the world as well as several parts of this country, and choosing only one place I’d want to return to is quite difficult. I’ve mentioned before that I’m an optimist, and I’ve found beauty in each of these places. Each has its own story, including the challenges that every society faces. I wouldn’t mind visiting any of them another time. But one trip that made a profound impact on me was when I went to Greece. I spent time both in the city of Athens as well as on the island of Paros, and I loved both! So much beauty, so much history, and I’d love to return and soak it up again. But my bad back and knees would prevent me from enjoying it completely. My back seizes up whenever I try to sit on hard surfaces, and it’s really difficult to find upholstered chairs anywhere. My knees hurt when I go up and down stairs, and there are a whole lot of stairs going up the hill to the Acropolis! So unless some Greek millionaire invites me to his estate and includes a muscle-bound lackey to carry me and my thick pillows around, I probably won’t return, except by looking at the many pictures I took. 

What trip would you like to repeat?

Advertisement

About Patricia Kiyono

During her first career, Patricia Kiyono taught elementary music, computer classes, elementary classrooms, and junior high social studies. She now teaches music education at the university level. She lives in southwest Michigan with her husband, not far from her five children, nine grandchildren (so far), and great-granddaughters. Current interests, aside from writing, include sewing, crocheting, scrapbooking, and music. A love of travel and an interest in faraway people inspires her to create stories about different cultures. Check out her sweet historical contemporary romances at her Amazon author page: http://www.amazon.com/Patricia-Kiyono/e/B0067PSM5C/
This entry was posted in big plans, decisions, experiences, Life, Patricia Kiyono, Travel and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Return Trip

  1. I hope that you can get back to those places, especially Japan, Patty. You have the health (except knees!) and all is reasonably settled around you.
    I get the knees part, really! I see pictures from friends in Italy and Greece, see all the places that I would love to visit but think, “I’d never make those stairs!”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      Yes, both Italy and Greece are notorious for long stairways and uncomfortable seating! Actually, Japan is, too, but I have more incentive for going back there.

      Like

  2. Jeff Salter says:

    Gosh… you’re certainly well-traveled. I had previously picked up that you’d been to several interesting locations, across the world — but had not realized how many. And quite a variety of destinations.
    Love your description of the guys toting you up and down all those stairs!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Elaine Cantrell says:

    I haven’t been to Greece, but I’d sure love to.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Diane Burton says:

    You really are well-traveled. I did a lot of traveling with my girlfriends when I was single. We saw a lot of the U.S. Hubs and I looked forward to traveling in retirement. We’ve done some but not as much as we thought. Then covid hit and health issues have prevented us from traveling much. If you find that muscle-bound lackey willing to carry you around, send him my way when you’re done. LOL

    Liked by 1 person

    • Patricia Kiyono says:

      If I find one, I will probably bring him home to help me get around here too! The pandemic certainly changed plans for a lot of people. Thanks for chiming in!

      Like

  5. All of your trips sound amazing. I probably won’t ever travel the world but I do enjoy virtual tours and looking at photos friends have taken on their travels.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s